TOME: Interactive TOpic Model and MEtadata Visualization

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TOME is a tool to support the interactive exploration and visualization of text-based archives, supported by a Digital Humanities Startup Grant from the National Endowment for the Humanities (Lauren Klein and Jacob Eisenstein, co-PIs). Drawing upon the technique of topic modeling—a computational method for identifying themes that recur across a collection—our tool will allow humanities scholars to trace the evolution and circulation of these themes across social networks and over time. 

Publications related to this project include:

  • Klein, L., J. Eisenstein, and I. Sun. “Exploratory Thematic Analysis for Digitized Archival Collections.” Digital Scholarship in the Humanities 30.1 (2015).
  • Eisenstein, J., I. Sun and L. Klein. “Exploratory Text Analysis for Large Document Archives.’ Proceedings of Digital Humanities 2014. Hamburg: Univ. of Hamburg, 2014.
  • Eisenstein, J. and L. Klein. “Reading Thomas Jefferson with TopicViz: Towards a Thematic Method for Exploring Large Cultural Archives.” Proceedings of the Implementing New Knowledge Environments (INKE) Annual Meeting 2012. Vancouver: Scholarly and Research Communication, 2013.

Presentations related to this project include:

  • “Developing and Sustaining Collaborative Research.” Roundtable. Modern Language Association, Austin, TX, January 2016.
  • The Carework and Codework of Nineteenth-Century Abolitionist Newspapers.” The Digital Antiquarian, American Antiquarian Society, May 2015.
  • “Beyond the Digital Surrogate: Discovery and Analysis of Digital Collections.” Roundtable. Digital Library Federation Forum, Atlanta, GA, October 2014.
  • “The Best-Laid Schemes: Reflections on Three Years of the NEH ODH Data Management Plan Requirement.” Roundtable. Digital Library Federation Forum, Atlanta, GA, October 2014.
  • Exploratory Thematic Analysis for Historical Newspaper Archives.” Institute for Quantitative Theory and Methods. Emory University, April 2015. Also presented at Digital Humanities, Hamburg, Germany, July 2014.
  • “Towards a Thematic Method for Exploring Large Cultural Archives,” with Jacob Eisenstein. Research Foundations for Understanding Books and Reading in the Digital Age, Havana, Cuba, December 2012.

Contributors: Lauren Klein, Jacob Eisenstein, Iris Sun, Catherine Roshelli

3 Responses

  1. Editors’ Choice: The Carework and Codework of the Digital Humanities | Digital Humanities Now

    […] still remains out of reach. I will illustrate this double function through the example of the TOME project, a digital tool that I’ve been developing with my colleague at Georgia Tech, Jacob […]

  2. Editor’s Choice: The Carework and Codework of the Digital Humanities | Lauren Klein | Digital Humanities Now

    […] still remains out of reach. I will illustrate this double function through the example of the TOME project, a digital tool that I’ve been developing with my colleague at Georgia Tech, Jacob […]

  3. What Has the Digital Meant to American Periodicals Scholarship? | Ryan Cordell

    […] during the Civil War,[10], assess and map language patterns in historical Texas newspapers,[11] trace the evolution and circulation of themes in abolitionist newspapers (and other digital archives),[12] detect poetic content in historical […]

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